Tag Archives: protest

Women’s March on Washington

Just some personal notes of reflection: I recently found myself reading a pretty provocative cocktail of books… A friend gave me “The Gift of Anger” by Arun Gandhi while I was in middle of reading “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

One thing is truly glaringGandhi and MLK’s ideas of non-violence have been so perverted by connotations of passivity. Practicing non-violence does not mean a movement is non-confrontational. Non-violence does not equate legality with morality. Movements rooted in non-violence acknowledge the plight of marginalized people who have turned to violence in the throes of oppression.

In order to be loving and empathetic, we must understand systems of oppression and mindfully learn ways to foster agency for those who have historically been disenfranchised. 

———-

Anger is a powerful tool in the hands of the oppressed. It is the industrious force behind action and in this case, is the vehicle for change. A year ago on January 21, 2017, an estimated 725,000 gathered in Washington D.C. and an estimated 4 million people gathered worldwide in solidarity for the Women’s March. It was visually commanding to witness the sheer density of people that filled the streets. According to the Washington Post, it “was likely the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” But gathering in cites across the world was only the beginning. Among countless actions of resistance this year and following it with gusto, a record number of women are running for office and Tanara Burke’s “Me Too” movement which was created originally in 2007 as “a grass-roots movement to aid sexual assault survivors in underprivileged communities where rape crisis centers and sexual assault workers weren’t going” has reached women across the world. “Empowerment through empathy” is being employed to help speak about experiences of sexual harassment and assault. And the momentum is only building.

Womens March on WashingtonWomens March on Washingtonstoryboard003Womens March on WashingtonRoxbury Newsstoryboard004Womens March on WashingtonWomens March on Washingtonstoryboard002Womens March on WashingtonWomens March on Washingtonstoryboard005Roxbury NewsWomens March on Washingtonstoryboard006Womens March on WashingtonWomens March on Washingtonstoryboard007Womens March on WashingtonWomens March on Washingtonstoryboard008DANIFRESH_WOMENSMARCHONWASHINGTON_BLOG_JANUARY2017-29Womens March on Washingtonstoryboard009Womens March on WashingtonWomens March on WashingtonWomens March on WashingtonWomen’s March on Washington. January, 2017. Dani Fresh//Roxbury News

Black Lives Matter

One of the hundreds of articles that resonated with me over the last few months was written by a woman named Brittany Cooper, titled, “I am utterly undone: My struggle with black rage and fear after Ferguson.” She begins by saying, “If I have to begin by convincing you that Black Lives Matter, we have all already lost, haven’t we? So let’s not begin there. Let’s begin at the end. At the end there is only Michael Brown Jr.’s dead body, no justice, and weeping and gnashing of teeth.” Be still, my heart. Black America is speaking right now, and we should be listening…

So, this is Georgi.

DSC_0422

And this is what she has to say:

On Saturday I attended a Die-in for Mike Brown and other victims of police brutality. I was pleased that people of all ages, races and walks of life were willing to brave the cold in support of change. Though police brutality is an issue that has historically plagued the black community at higher rates than other ethnic groups, it is not a black issue. It is an American issue. We shout that Black Lives Matter not because any other life is less important, but because it is not something that is often said. The message that we are sent when we see images of black bodies laying dead and exposed is that black lives are expendable. We are here to correct that narrative. We, as Americans, must stand against the idea that any of us should be allowed to be treated this way. We must have the courage to have open, difficult discussions about our collective history. We must actively work to stretch ourselves beyond our comfort zones. We must learn to love, forgive and trust again. The conversations will be messy at first, sometimes we will disagree but if we cannot find the courage to begin the dialogue, nothing will ever change. The Harrisburg police department did an excellent job of offering us support as we peacefully protested and made our voices heard, and we would like to invite them to join the dialogue. Together we can build a brighter future, for Harrisburg and beyond. (Georgianna Hicks)

DSC_9870DSC_9919storyboard004DSC_9962DSC_9971storyboard005storyboard006storyboard007DSC_0058storyboard008DSC_0111storyboard009DSC_0090storyboard010DSC_0130DSC_0134DSC_0160storyboard011DSC_0163storyboard012DSC_0268DSC_0248storyboard013DSC_0308storyboard014DSC_0309storyboard015DSC_0322storyboard016DSC_0409storyboard017DSC_0405